Dr. Ray finally seems ready to tell all.

Accused of fraudulently finding plaintiffs sick in asbestos lawsuits looking for quick settlement, West Virginia's most notorious radiologist has had nothing to say for many months.

When Congress wanted to hear how he made $10 million working for asbestos lawyers -- it was even alleged that he diagnosed 515 plaintiffs in a single day -- Harron pleaded the fifth. He's done the same in depositions here, declining to answer questions from CSX Transportation, a company suing him and others for asbestos fraud and deceit.

But Harron isn't against defending himself. West Virginia Record reporter Steve Korris discovered that the infamous Bridgeport doctor has filed a slander and defamation lawsuit in Mississippi charging National Services Industries (NSI) with harming his good name and reputation.

At issue are charges made by the company in a lawsuit filed against Harron, his son, and a prolific X-ray dealer last February. It outlines an alleged fraud conspiracy to gin up masses of medical screenings for hundreds of asbestos plaintiff lawsuits.

"The screenings were all about the money for defendants ... and not about providing health care," NSI charged.

NSI also quoted U.S. District Judge Janis Jack, who exposed Harron in a 2005 lawsuit after defense lawyers pointed out thousands of double diagnoses for plaintiffs that Harron claimed had two distinct, rare diseases, one from inhaling asbestos fibers and another from inhaling sand.

The odds of one person having both diseases, Judge Jack said, is about the same of a golfer making a hole-in-one. Back then Harron testified as an expert witness before Judge Jack. He tried to explain himself until the judge stopped the questioning, suggesting Harron should get a lawyer before he said more.

We haven't heard from Harron since. But now that he seems ready to testify in a Mississippi court about being defamed, there's no reason for him not to testify here, where local victims are making similar allegations about his herculean work habits and speed of light diagnosis efficiency.

The floor is yours, Dr. Ray. We're eager to listen.

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