State employees shouldn’t have to listen to a lecher

By The West Virginia Record | May 10, 2013

As a pesticide officer for the West Virginia Department of Agriculture, Robert Adams was familiar with the various insects and diseases that attack produce and livestock in our state, and with the poisons used to control pests and parasites.


As a pesticide officer for the West Virginia Department of Agriculture, Robert Adams was familiar with the various insects and diseases that attack produce and livestock in our state, and with the poisons used to control pests and parasites.

Under the circumstances, you’d think he’d do his best to help eradicate smut, not foster the dissemination of it.

What do you do when a pesticide officer makes a pest of himself?

Robert’s rules of ardor were considerably more lax than most. He had a purple streak and liked to make off-color remarks at inappropriate times, in inappropriate settings, and in inappropriate company.

It’s not that his co-workers were prudes. It’s just that Robert was operating with the wrong kind of license.

No matter what the topic of conversation was, Robert could find the salty side of it. Let someone mention a helicopter crash and you could count on him making some lewd comment about how the pilot must have gotten distracted while trying to join the “mile high club.”

Whoa! Where’d that come from? It’s not even funny. A helicopter crashed. People died.

Did someone say something about liking hot buttered popcorn? That would be Bawdy Bob’s cue to recommend a “hot buttered orgy.”

Speaking of orgies, how about that music Robert played on his office radio with the moaning women in simulated ecstasy? Who wouldn’t want to listen to that while trying to get work done?

And how about the time he caught someone “off guard” when he burst into the women’s restroom? He was looking for a male employee, he explained. In the women’s restroom?

Then there were the smutty materials in his office and the smutty websites he accessed on the office computer during office hours.

After he was let go, Robert filed suit, unsuccessfully, in Kanawha County Circuit Court for wrongful termination, etc. Recently, before the state Supreme Court, he lost his appeal.

Not that he ever had any.

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