JAN DILS ATTORNEYS AT LAW: Resources and Your Social Security Disability Claim

By Press release submission | Aug 3, 2018

Many people aren’t aware of the differences between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law issued the following announcement on July 26.

Many people aren’t aware of the differences between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). While there are many differences between the two programs, the most significant difference pertains to income and resources. Supplemental Security Income is a need-based program. Social Security Disability is based on your work credits. If you have a lot of resources, your SSDI claim won’t be impacted. However, since SSI is income-based, your resources could impact your claim. Many SSI applicants find the rules about resources confusing. To clarify some of the most common misconceptions about resources, we compiled a list of tips and we’re sharing some of our best advice from the past 24 years.

What is a resource?

According to the SSA, a resource is something that you own, such as cash, bank accounts, land, life insurance, personal property, vehicles, and anything else you own that could be exchanged for cash.

SSI Resource Limits

If you’re single, the Social Security Administration states that you can’t have more than $2,000 in resources. However, not all resources count against you. We’ll explain more about resources that don’t count against you later. If you’re married, the limit is raised to $3,000. This is the same regardless of whether one or both spouses are disabled.

What Resources Don’t Count for SSI?

The house you live in

One vehicle, if it is used for transportation for you or a member of your household

Life insurance policies you own with a face value of $1,500 or less per person

Burial plots or spaces for you or your immediate family

A burial fund of up to $1,500 each for you and your spouse’s burial expenses

Household goods and personal effects

Property you or your spouse use in a trade or business, or on your job if you work for someone else

If you are disabled or blind, money or property you have set aside under a Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS)

If you are over the resource limit, you will not be eligible for SSI. Since SSI is based on need, many people won’t have to worry about a lot of the issues with resources. However, because of how nuanced the SSA rules are pertaining to resources, it can be confusing. That’s one of the reasons why so many people seek the help of attorneys like Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law. We have the knowledge to help individuals navigate the Social Security maze. Call us today for a free consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a different time, fill out this form so our Intake team can schedule you for a later date.

Original source can be found here.

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